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A Chinese Confucianist’s Philosophy: Interpreting the Ink Rubbings of the Wu Liang Shrine Stone Engravings

November 9, 2021
5:30 pm CST
New Perspectives talk, online

Closed captioned

Join Yutong Ma, master’s student in the Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design in the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts, for a talk exploring ink rubbings of original stone engravings from the Wu Family Ancestral Shrine in Shandong province, China. The ink rubbings, an ancient technique to reproduce and study carved stone surfaces, present a narrative of Chinese history until the second century CE and provide insight into Wu Liang’s philosophy as a Confucianist scholar. The talk will situate scenes depicted in five ink rubbings from the Museum’s collection within the architectural space of the Wu Liang Shrine and the sociopolitical context of China during the Eastern Han dynasty (25–220 CE).

The program will include live closed captions in English.

This program is free, but registration is required (registration link to come).

New Perspectives

New Perspectives talks are opportunities to learn more about the Museum’s collection from emerging scholars. The talks are given by graduate students in Arts & Sciences and the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts and focus on one or more works from the collection, often aligning with the students’ own expertise and scholarly interests.

About the speaker

Yutong Ma is a master’s student in the Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design in the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts. She studies histories of Islamic architecture and Chinese architecture with a focus on the role of architecture as a cultural manifestation. She holds a BA in architecture from Washington University in St. Louis.

Image credit

Unknown (Chinese, Han Dynasty), Temple rubbing from Wu Liang Tz'u, n.d. Ink rubbing on paper. Gift of Mrs. Ingram F. Boyd, 1971.